Liberal Arts Core Requirements

In the course lists throughout this catalog, courses meeting Liberal Arts Core Requirements are designated with *.

Humanities

12 credits

Introductory college-level courses are required in history and literature. Students also select two courses in two different fields from designated fine arts, advanced history, or advanced literature courses.

Introductory History (HI-1 Designation)

One course from the following is required:

HI 103Western Civilization I *

3

HI 104Western Civilization II *

3

HI 110History of the United States to 1877 *

3

HI 111History of the United States since 1877 *

3

Introductory Literature (LT-1 Designation)

One course from the following is required:

EN 201World Literature: The Ancient World *

3

EN 202World Literature: The Middle Ages *

3

EN 203World Literature: Renaissance through Enlightenment *

3

EN 204World Literature: Romanticism through Post Modernism *

3

EN 205American Literature I *

3

EN 206American Literature II *

3

EN 207Theater History *

3

EN 208Digital Approaches to Literature *

3

EN 220The Movie or the Book? Narrative Adaptation in the Cinema *

3

EN 225Literary Superheroes *

3

EN 227Short Fiction *

3

EN 230American Multicultural Literature *

3

IS 220The Movie or the Book? Narrative Adaptation in the Cinema *

3

Fine Arts, Advanced History with a prerequisite, Advanced Literature with a prerequisite (FNA, HI-2, or LT-2 Designation)

Two courses in two different fields from the following are required:

EN 321Modern Drama *

3

EN 32219th Century British Poets *

3

EN 330Chaucer and the Courtly Love Tradition *

3

EN 340Major Women Writers *

3

EN 345Ethnic Literary Traditions *

3

EN 350The American Dream *

3

EN 351Literature of Childhood and Adolescence *

3

EN 355Shakespeare *

3

EN 357Topics in Literature Before 1800 *

3

EN 426Studies in the Novel *

3

EN 428Studies in Contemporary Literature *

3

EN 429Topics in Performance *

3

EN 490Major Author(s) *

3

FA 103Two-Dimensional Design *

3

FA 104Color Theory *

3

FA 105Drawing I *

3

FA 107Hand-Built Ceramics *

3

FA 110Cross-Cultural Visual Thinking *

3

FA 121Music History I *

3

FA 122Music History II *

3

FA 150History of Jazz *

3

FA 161Dance Appreciation *

3

FA 165Beginning Modern Dance *

3

FA 170Beginning Jazz Dance *

3

FA 201Introduction to Art History: Ancient to Medieval *

3

FA 202Introduction to Art History: Renaissance to Modern *

3

FA 211Printmaking *

3

FA 213Painting *

3

FA 215Wheel-Thrown Ceramics *

3

FA 380Movements in Modern Art *

3

FA 410Topics in Art History *

3

HI 304History of the British Isles: Iron Age to 1603 *

3

HI 310Modern European History: 1815-1914 *

3

HI 311Modern European History: 1914 to the Present *

3

HI 322Colonial and Revolutionary America *

3

HI 323The Early National Period and the Jacksonian Era *

3

HI 325BTopics in American History: Ethnicity and Immigration *

3

HI 325CTopics in American History: The Frontier *

3

HI 325DTopics in American History: Virginia and the Old South *

3

HI 325GTopics in American History: African Americans Since 1865 *

3

HI 325HTopics in American History: The Old West in American Memory *

3

HI 325ITopics in American History: America and the World Wars *

3

HI 345The Gilded Age and the Progressive Era *

3

HI 350Modern United States History *

3

HI 365History of Medieval Europe *

3

HI 370History of Christianity in Medieval Europe *

3

HI 375The Renaissance and the Reformation *

3

HPR 170Beginning Jazz Dance *

3

Mathematics and Sciences

19 credits

College-level courses are required in mathematics, natural science, and social science. Four fields — economics, politics, psychology, and sociology — constitute the social sciences, and requirements vary depending upon the degree being sought.

Mathematics (MT Designation)

One course from the following is required. Credits from MA 019W, MA 094, and MA 095 may not be applied toward any degree.

MA 119Math for Liberal Arts with Quantitative Reasoning Workshop *

3

MA 121Math for Liberal Arts *

3

MA 124History of Mathematics *

3

MA 127Applied Geometry *

3

MA 132Statistical Analysis *

3

MA 151Mathematical Methods for Business *

3

MA 171Calculus with Precalculus A *

4

MA 181Calculus *

4

MA 200Calculus of the Infinite *

3

MA 260Discrete Mathematics for Information Technology *

3

Natural Science (NS Designation)

At least one course with laboratory from the following is required. Some students have the option of completing a second Natural Science (NS) course, lab optional, or a third Introductory Social Science (SS-1) course.

ASTR 101Astronomy *

3

BIO 110Introduction to Environmental Science *

3

BIO 111Human Genetics for Non-majors *

3

BIO 120Introduction to the Biological World *

3

BIO 127Introduction to Marine Biology and Tropical Ecology *

4-6

BIO 151General Biology I *

3

BIO 152General Biology II *

3

BIO 161Anatomy and Physiology I *

3

BIO 162Anatomy and Physiology II *

3

BIO 262Genetics for Majors *

3

BIO 327Introduction to Marine Biology and Tropical Ecology *

6

CHM 110Science of Light and Color *

4

CHM 125Life Chemistry *

3

CHM 151Principles of Chemistry I *

3

CHM 152Principles of Chemistry II *

3

GEOL 102Principles of Geology *

3

PSC 103Introduction to the Physical Sciences *

3

PHYS 161College Physics I *

3

PHYS 162College Physics II *

3

PHYS 271General Physics I *

3

PHYS 272General Physics II *

3

Introductory Social Science (SS-1 Designation)

The following requirements apply to all students, except those completing a Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.):

Two introductory courses in two different fields are required; students must also select between one more of the following courses or a second Natural Science (NS) course, lab optional.

B.B.A. students: ECO 210; ECO 211; and one Introductory Social Science (SS-1) course from politics, psychology, or sociology, are required.

ECO 210Principles of Microeconomics *

3

ECO 211Principles of Macroeconomics *

3

POL 102International Relations *

3

POL 103Comparative Politics *

3

POL 104American Government *

3

PSY 101General Psychology *

3

PSY 110Human Growth and Development *

3

SOC 131Principles of Sociology *

3

SOC 203The Global Village *

3

SOC 204Cultural Diversity *

3

SOC 251Working for Justice, Working for Change *

3

SOC 261Through the Sociological Lens I *

3

Advanced Social Science (SS-2 Designation)

All students, except B.B.A. students, select one Advanced Social Science (SS-2) course with a prerequisite from the following.

B.B.A. students select an Advanced Social Science (SS-2) or second Natural Science (NS) course, lab optional.

CJ 305Criminology *

3

ECO 304Environmental Economics *

3

ECO 305Business and Economics of Sports *

3

ECO 332Money and Banking *

3

ECO 350Economics of Poverty *

3

ECO 353Law and Economics *

3

ECO 431Contemporary Issues in Economics *

3

HPR 406Stress Management *

3

POL 300State and Urban Politics *

3

POL 305American Policy Process *

3

POL 307Race and Politics *

3

POL 310Political Parties and Interest Groups *

3

POL 312Media and Politics *

3

POL 315The Presidency *

3

POL 320The Congress *

3

POL 330Judicial Politics *

3

POL 355Global Security *

3

POL 360Global Political Economy *

3

POL 375Politics of Environmental Issues *

3

POL 380Politics of Latin America *

3

POL 381Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa *

3

POL 382Politics of Western Europe *

3

POL 385Politics of South Asia *

3

POL 386Politics of East Asia *

3

POL 388Politics of North America *

3

PSY 230Abnormal Psychology *

3

PSY 311Early Childhood Development *

3

PSY 313Adulthood and Aging *

3

PSY 321Psychology of Gender *

3

PSY 325Cultural Psychology *

3

PSY 341Psychology of Individuals with Exceptionalities *

3

PSY 363Abnormal Primate Psychology *

3

PSY 406Stress Management *

3

SOC 306Social Inequality in Arlington *

3

SOC 322Racial and Ethnic Diversity *

3

SOC 350Social Justice *

3

SOC 351Addressing Injustice: Research Methods *

3

SOC 352Addressing Injustice: Quantitative Research Methods *

3

SOC 361Through the Sociological Lens II *

3

SOC 365Gender Inequality in Global Perspective *

3

SOC 375Topics in Human Rights *

3

SOC 385Global Inequality and Community Development *

3

Philosophy/Theology and Religious Studies, including Moral Principles courses

12 credits

All students take introductory and advanced courses in philosophy and in theology/religious studies. When choosing courses from the advanced sequence, one course must be a designated moral principles course. If a student chooses an Advanced Philosophy (PH-2) course, the other course must be chosen from the Theological Ethics (TRS-E) courses. If a student chooses an Advanced Theology/Religious Studies (TRS-2) course, the other course must be chosen from the Philosophical Ethics (PH-E) courses.

Introductory Philosophy (PH-1 Designation)

All students take the following course:

PH 100Introduction to Philosophy *

3

Advanced Philosophy (PH-2 Designation)

To be chosen by students who have taken, or will take, a Theological Ethics course (TRS-E):

PH 300Modern Logic *

3

PH 315Metaphysics and Epistemology *

3

PH 325Ancient Philosophy *

3

PH 326Medieval Philosophy *

3

PH 327Modern Philosophy *

3

PH 328Contemporary Philosophy: 19th-21st Century *

3

PH 330Philosophy of Mind *

3

PH 345Philosophy of Religion *

3

PH 350Philosophy of Science *

3

PH 355Existentialism and Phenomenology *

3

PH 360Philosophy and Literature *

3

PH 365Asian Philosophy *

3

PH 370Philosophy of Art *

3

Philosophical Ethics (PH-E moral principles Designation)

To be chosen by students who have taken, or will take, an Advanced Theology/Religious Studies (TRS-2) course:

PH 301Social and Political Philosophy *

3

PH 303Animals, the Environment, and Ethics *

3

PH 305Business Ethics *

3

PH 307Philosophy of Law *

3

PH 309Ethical Theory *

3

Introductory Theology (TRS-1 Designation)

All students take the following course:

TRS 100Theological Inquiry *

3

Advanced Theology/Religious Studies (TRS-2 Designation)

To be chosen by students who have taken, or will take, a Philosophical Ethics course (PH-E):

TRS 201Understanding Religion *

3

TRS 202Religions of the World *

3

TRS 251The Religion of the Old Testament *

3

TRS 260The New Testament Gospels *

3

TRS 261The New Testament Epistles *

3

TRS 270Christ in Christianity *

3

TRS 271The Christian God: One and Three *

3

TRS 272The Mystery of the Church *

3

TRS 273Sacraments in Christian Theology *

3

TRS 280Faith & Doubt in Christian Theology *

3

TRS 320American Religious History *

3

TRS 325Religious Approaches to Death *

3

TRS 330Religious Journeys of Young Adults *

3

TRS 361Grace and Sin, Heaven and Hell *

3

TRS 362Friendship, Marriage, and God *

3

TRS 370The Bible as Literature *

3

TRS 380The History of the Early Church *

3

TRS 381Medieval and Reformed Theology *

3

TRS 382The Church in the Modern World *

3

Theological Ethics (TRS-E moral principles Designation)

One course to be chosen by students who have taken, or will take, an Advanced Philosophy (PH-2) course:

TRS 351The Foundations of Christian Morality *

3

TRS 352Catholic Medical Morality *

3

TRS 353Catholic Social Morality *

3

Written Communication

6 credits

Written Communication (WR Designation)

All students take the following two courses:

EN 101Composition I *

3

EN 102Composition II *

3