Mathematics (B.S.)

The study of mathematics introduces students to mathematical abstraction as well as how mathematics can be used to solve practical problems. Many courses in this discipline provide the basic foundations necessary to support study in all majors. Whenever possible, mathematics courses introduce concepts using applications, analytical solutions (equation solving), numerical approximations, and graphical interpretations.

The mathematics major requirements fall into four categories:

  • foundation courses, offered each semester, are prerequisites for subsequent courses;
  • introduction-to-proof courses, offered on a rotating basis, give students a more clear idea of pure mathematics;
  • applied or computational mathematics, offered on a rotating basis, encourage students to use mathematics to solve, or elucidate, real-world problems; and
  • high-level proof courses, offered on a rotating basis, push students to understand mathematics in a deeper, more abstract way.

A special feature of Marymount's mathematics program is the fall seminar series. Faculty members and students meet for one hour each week to hear presentations by professional mathematicians about their career paths. Students also give short presentations on mathematical topics of interest.

Beyond regular coursework, several faculty members have collaborated with students on joint research projects, most notably in mathematics education and in computational biology. Faculty and students regularly present their research findings at national conferences.

Upon successful completion of the mathematics program, students will be able to

  • gather, evaluate, and use relevant mathematical definitions and results to create logical, grammatically correct proofs;
  • connect mathematical ideas to real-world applications, including the creation and interpretation of mathematical models;
  • communicate mathematical ideas through oral and written presentations;
  • use a variety of technologies to solve mathematical problems;
  • articulate career, internship, and summer program opportunities for mathematicians; and
  • pose, research, and address new mathematical questions.

Marymount’s mathematics program prepares students for immediate careers in the field, as well as for graduate study. Computation and modeling are intentionally infused into the major so students are ready for jobs that require strong technical abilities. Marymount mathematics majors can also earn licensure to teach middle school or high school mathematics.

After meeting the Liberal Arts Core and University Requirements, mathematics majors have 21 to 26 elective credit hours. Students are encouraged to apply those credits toward other options such as teaching licensure in secondary mathematics or a minor or second major in biology, economics, or information technology. Mathematics majors are also eligible to consider participation in the five-year B.S./M.S. in information technology program. (See B.S./M.S. program for further information.)

Degree Planning: Note that course rotations vary and not every course is available each semester. Course rotations are specified in the Course Descriptions of this catalog. Individual advising is important to ensure fulfilling major requirements and the scheduling of additional coursework chosen to meet career objectives.

Minimum Grade Requirements: A minimum grade of C in any course that serves as a prerequisite for a higher-numbered course.

Degree Requirements — Mathematics

This degree requires a total of 120 credits.

Liberal Arts Core and University Requirements

See University Requirements and the Liberal Arts Core for details. Mathematics majors will satisfy the three-course university Writing-Intensive (WI) requirement in the following way: MA 420 Abstract Algebra, MA 425 Introduction to Real Analysis, and one additional WI course from the Liberal Arts Core or as a university elective.

Major Requirements

To fulfill the requirements of the major, all students in this program will take the following coursework in a sequence determined in collaboration with a faculty advisor. Some courses also satisfy Liberal Arts Core and/or University Requirements.

IT 130Java Programming

4

 

MA 181Calculus *

4

OR

MA 171Calculus with Precalculus A *

4

AND

MA 172Calculus with Precalculus B

4

 

MA 200Calculus of the Infinite *

3

MA 210Seminar with Introduction to Proofs through Discrete Math

3

MA 215Linear Algebra and Proof Techniques

3

MA 218Probability and Statistics

3

MA 221Multivariable Calculus

4

MA 230Scientific Computing

3

MA 257Introduction to Number Theory and Proof Techniques *

3

MA 309Mathematics Seminar

1

MA 325Differential Equations *

3

 

MA 400Internship *

3

OR

MA 433Research *

1

 

MA 409Mathematics Seminar

1

MA 418Stochastic Modeling

3

MA 420Abstract Algebra *

3

MA 425Introduction to Real Analysis *

3

 

PHYS 271General Physics I *

3

PHYS 271LGeneral Physics I Lab

1

AND

PHYS 272General Physics II *

3

PHYS 272LGeneral Physics II Lab

1

OR

BIO 151General Biology I *

3

BIO 151LGeneral Biology I Lab *

1

AND

BIO 262Genetics for Majors *

3

BIO 262LGenetics for Majors Lab

1

MA 181, MA 200: Students may complete either MA 181 or the MA 171 and MA 172 sequence, which is the equivalent of MA 181, during the first year. Also, MA 181 and MA 200 can be waived with appropriate AP credit. Students should take noted courses in a sequence specified by an advisor and, upon successful completion, may not subsequently register for a lower-numbered course in the calculus sequence.

MA 210, MA 309, MA 409: Transfer students or new majors who join the program after the fall semester of their sophomore year will take mathematics seminar classes every fall semester, starting with MA 210. Such students may need to make up the credit hours to meet the 120-credit minimum requirement toward graduation.

Sample Degree Plan — Mathematics

Please note that this is a sample plan; all students must consult with an advisor in making course selections.

Year One — Fall

DSC 101DISCOVER First-Year Seminar *

3

EN 101Composition I *

3

MA 181Calculus *

4

Introductory Social Science (SS-1) core course *

3

One (1) elective

3

EN 101: WR core course

MA 181: (MT core course) Not all students should begin with MA 181. Follow placement recommendations and advisor guidance in course selection.

Year One — Spring

EN 102Composition II *

3

IT 130Java Programming

4

MA 200Calculus of the Infinite *

3

MA 218Probability and Statistics

3

TRS 100Theological Inquiry *

3

EN 102: WR core course

TRS 100: TRS-1 core course

Year Two — Fall

MA 210Seminar with Introduction to Proofs through Discrete Math

3

 

PHYS 271General Physics I *

3

PHYS 271LGeneral Physics I Lab

1

OR

BIO 151General Biology I *

3

BIO 151LGeneral Biology I Lab *

1

 

EN Introductory Literature (LT-1) core course *

3

HI Introductory History (HI-1) core course *

3

PHYS 271, BIO 151: NS core course

Year Two — Spring

MA 215Linear Algebra and Proof Techniques

3

MA 221Multivariable Calculus

4

 

PHYS 272General Physics II *

3

PHYS 272LGeneral Physics II Lab

1

OR

BIO 262Genetics for Majors *

3

BIO 262LGenetics for Majors Lab

1

 

Introductory Social Science (SS-1) core course *

3

One (1) elective

3

PHYS 272, BIO 262: NS core course

Year Three — Fall

MA 230Scientific Computing

3

MA 309Mathematics Seminar

1

MA 425Introduction to Real Analysis *

3

Fine Arts (FNA), Advanced Literature (LT-2), or Advanced History (HI-2) core course *

3

PH 100Introduction to Philosophy *

3

One (1) elective

3

PH 100: PH-1 core course

Year Three — Spring

MA 257Introduction to Number Theory and Proof Techniques *

3

MA 418Stochastic Modeling

3

Advanced Theology/Religious Studies (TRS-2) or Theological Ethics (TRS-E) core course *

3

Two (2) electives

Year Four — Fall

MA 325Differential Equations *

3

MA 400Internship *

3

MA 409Mathematics Seminar

1

MA 420Abstract Algebra *

3

Advanced Social Science (SS-2) core course *

Year Four — Spring

Fine Arts (FNA), Advanced Literature (LT-2), or Advanced History (HI-2) core course *

3

PH Advanced Philosophy (PH-2) or Philosophical Ethics (PH-E) core course *

3

Two (2) electives

* Fulfills Liberal Arts Core/University Requirements. See University Requirements and the Liberal Arts Core and the Course Descriptions for further information.